Tattered Past

Tattered Past: My ongoing journey through genealogy, history, writing, self-exploration and art. ~~~ Rita Ackerman





Tuesday, July 1, 2014

Remember When: Mothers and Sons

 We so often hear about the special relationships between mothers and sons or fathers and daughters. I've always found this to be interesting. Growing up in a household with just my mother and sister I didn't witness that dynamic.

This is my second great grandmother, Orpha Ann Collinsworth Waggoner, with her second husband whose name I can't remember. Her first husband was Joseph Waggoner who went off to fight in the Civil War and never returned. She was left with one small son, Isaac Tandy Waggoner.

The family lived in northeastern Tennessee and she was near her parents and siblings so there was a lot of male support. I wonder what kind of relationship she had with her son.



This is Isaac Tandy Waggoner and his wife. Salenia Alzadie Freeman. Their daughter, Carrie, was my grandmother who died before I was born.


Next is my dad who apparently loved his mother very much. I don't remember either of them but the family still has the trunk my dad made for his mother in high school. 

Isaac never really knew his dad. I never knew mine. No matter what we do or where we go things stay the same. Sometimes I wonder: What if? What if my mom and dad had worked it out and he had always been around? What if he wasn't killed in a car accident and I was able to get to know him when I got older? What if Joseph had returned from the War? What if Carrie hadn't died from cancer before I was born? 

Write about some of your family dynamics. Imagine what might have happened if something had happened differently. Write a short story about that change. 


1 comment:

  1. Hi Rita! i love all the old historic photos you have been posting. In answer to your question about the Paint, stitch and store class-it is done on the machine. It's a fun and easy class. The painting part takes several steps.

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