Tattered Past

Tattered Past: My ongoing journey through genealogy, history, writing, self-exploration and art. ~~~ Rita Ackerman





Friday, September 30, 2011

Things That Never Change



One of the things I have to do for my job as a genealogist and historian is scan old newspapers (and other records) for specific information. The other day I had to go through the Phoenix Daily Herald for early 1895. Here's one of the pages I chose at random and because I liked that add in the upper right-hand corner.

These newspapers are on microfilm and this is actually one of the better ones as far as clarity and ease of reading. Every time I have to do this it comes to me how much things really don't change.

In 1895 the schools were short on funding, a woman and her two children barely escaped a house fire, there were a couple of shootings and a stabbing, a new restaurant opened and the county prisoners were working on the road between Phoenix and Tempe.

The Bee Hive store had these quarter-page ads that changed every day. The art work was fun to see. I chose a copy of this one because of the dress.

If you've visited downtown
Phoenix you probably saw the Rosson House. It is a beautiful Victorian house
built for Dr. Rosson in 1895.
about-thumb

I can just picture Dr. Rosson sitting on that lovely porch reading the Phoenix Herald and wondering if he should head to the Bee Hive for a new scarf.


 

4 comments:

  1. A fabulous page full of bygone lives. Beautiful to see. penny

    ReplyDelete
  2. I never saw that house in Phoenix--very cool.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I love old newspapers . . . they are such a great record of how people lived and what they thought about. It is amazing how much things change, but also stay the same. :-)

    ReplyDelete
  4. That Rosson House is so gorgeous, so is that entire square. We often think things were so elegant back then but life was just as ferocious as it is today. I'm off to the Beehive for a new style!

    ReplyDelete

Please leave a comment so I know you were here. Comments are like Internet hugs.